Posts Tagged ‘Sustainability’

The more you know the more you know you don’t know

by Professor Martin Bide, Department of Textiles, Fashion Merchandising and Design, University of Rhode Island, USA

Dyeing and colour are subjects that lie in the Bermuda-like triangle with the academic/scientific, industrial/technical, and creative/artistic at the corners. (Outside the triangle is a vast sea of “how hard can dyeing be, anyway?” but we won’t go there!)

Continue Reading Please Comment

Global Sustainability Initiatives

Hazardous chemicals and the impact of the Greenpeace Detox campaign on the textile dyeing and printing supply chain.

North of England region event. 24 September 2014, 6.15 –9.00pm, Mercure Norton Grange Hotel, Castleton, Rochdale OL11 2XZ

The textile industry is on the cusp of dramatic change. It is facing increasing pressure from NGOs as well as tighter regulation and rising costs. Developments arising from the ZDHC (Zero Discharge of Hazardous Chemicals) Joint Roadmap present a challenge as well as an opportunity. For some, dyehouses are obvious and very visual examples of poor practice within the textile supply chain. Discoloured effluent and water courses, unpleasant smells and the perceived use of dangerous chemicals are just some of the problems associated with poorly run dyehouses. However, for many retailers, dyehouses are part of the supply network that is sufficiently far away from their business for them to be to be considered someone else’s problem. And for those responsible retailers who want to minimise the impact of their supply network the coloration and finishing industry is complicated and difficult to influence.

Continue Reading Please Comment

The Circular Economy – something for everyone

James Clark from the University of York looks at the Circular Economy and its implications for sustainability.

The truly universal significance of the circular economy concept – today’s waste needs to be tomorrow resource – was brought home to me recently when I collected my car from a local small garage and the owner told me that he is now being offered about a quarter of the full price for old car batteries. The metals in batteries – and so many other common items are becoming valuable enough and scarce enough to make waste electronics and other metal-rich wastes a valuable commodity. It makes sense that rather than rely on a diminishing resource, mostly from regions where either local environmental, labor or political issues make supply problematic, let’s make better use of what we have on our doorstep – and we all have a lot of waste! But is this only an issue for waste electronics and electrical equipment (WEEE)?

Continue Reading Please Comment

Follow Us

Follow us on social media to get exclusive deals and discounts.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.